Category: Keep Me Posted 11 articles

Direct mail leaves a deeper footprint in your brain

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In a sea of online advertisements, direct mail remains a powerful, long-lasting tool for getting a message across. Much of this is owing to the tangibility of physical mail. In order to better understand the influence of physical mail compared to digital advertisements, researchers at the Centre for Experimental Consumer Psychology at Bangor University used fMRI scanning technology to see how the brain reacts to these different types of media.

What the return of the print catalog tells us about the power of direct mail

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As retailers push their e-commerce divisions and promote online sales, traditional methods of shopping via print catalog has fallen by the wayside. But major department stores have come to realize that abandoning their traditional catalog business could trigger a dip in sales.

Direct mail trends predict growth

growtharrowsDirect mail advertisements are still going strong. Despite the growth of digital advertisements, direct mail continues to proliferate as an efficient, proven marketing strategy. While direct mail took a hit following the 2008 recession, the rates have since stabilized. And, in fact, according to Experian Data Quality Group, total spending on print advertising mail is expected to rise from 11 percent to 12 percent by the year 2020.

The impact of cognitive load on direct mail vs. email

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Humans tend to prefer the path of least resistance. When it comes to understanding and remembering things we’re exposed to day-to-day, our brain follows suit. It’s something referred to in the world of neuromarketing as “cognitive load”.

Neuroscience study shows print ads have greater impact than digital ads

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While surveys and focus groups can help us understand why consumers act or behave a certain way, sometimes it takes a bit of science to reveal subconscious processes and reactions that we’re not aware of.

How our responses to direct mail evolve through time

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A single millennial, young family and an older retiree each has different ways that they perceive and are impacted by direct mail. A recent study published in the summer of 2016 by Royal Mail Market Research, the research division of the United Kingdom’s postal service, explored how our responses to direct mail change as we progress through the different stages of adult life. Here’s a summary of their findings.

Why direct mail still matters to millennials

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Despite being hooked on smartphones, tablets and social media, an online survey conducted by the United States Postal Service shows that the millennial generation is still influenced by direct mail. While the white paper, released in April 2016, focused on the relationship between millennials and political mail, we can draw plenty of inferences about how direct mail still matters to younger consumers -- especially since millennial homeowners are a growing demographic. 

Is VR the future of real estate?

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Quality photography and video tours can be powerful elements of a great listing. But realtors and tech analysts believe that the next major advancement in the way we shop for homes is the incorporation of Virtual Reality (VR) technology.

Direct mail in the home

mrch_image2While there have been several studies conducted on the efficacy of print advertising and what catches the attention of consumers, the fate of direct mail once it enters the home has long been a mystery to marketers. But in 2015, an 18-month ethnographic study from Royal Mail MarketReach, the marketing and data services branch of the United Kingdom’s postal service, was released. Using video footage captured within study participants’ homes, MarketReach observed consumer habits to learn how direct mail is handled in the home.

McCann CEO and ‘The Mail Moment’

blogpost12314At the 2016 National Postal Forum, Harris Diamond, CEO of advertising giant McCann Erickson addressed members of the mail industry with a compelling talk about the impact of direct mail. Diamond cited a study conducted by McCann that found the average American spends 25 minutes with their mail every day, which Diamond referred to as ‘The Mail Moment’.

“You come home from work, the mail in one hand, the cell phone in your pocket, and you sit down to go through the mail,” Diamond said at the National Postal Forum. “It's an important moment in people's lives and one that presents great marketing opportunities.”